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Cox Padmore Skolnik & Shakarchy LLP remains ready to serve you during the COVID-19 pandemic. We are prepared to provide you with continuous legal service and uninterrupted communication. We are also monitoring the legal impact of COVID-19 and we are available to discuss any questions you may have regarding the CARES Act, insurance coverage issues, including business Interruption insurance, or other issues. Please see below for a list of our practice areas. You may contact us by the usual means of telephone and email, which is encouraged at this time. We will promptly respond. Video conferencing is also available. In all, our firm remains committed to assisting you throughout this evolving period of legal, business, and safety concerns.

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  4.  | Divorce isn’t selfish, it’s self-care

Divorce isn’t selfish, it’s self-care

| Jun 29, 2020 | Divorce

People are sometimes opposed to divorce because they see it as a selfish move. They assume that the person filing for divorce is giving up on the marriage.

But is that fair? Many argue that it’s not. Someone who is unhappy in a relationship may just be practicing self-care. They’re chasing their own personal happiness. Everyone only has one life to live. Don’t they deserve to be happy? And, if they’re not, don’t they have a right to take the necessary steps to become happier?

This is most obvious, of course, in cases of abuse. It could be physical, mental, emotional, financial or sexual. Someone who is being abused has the right to take care of themselves and get out of a dangerous situation. You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who would dispute that.

But even when they’re not being abused, someone can be unhappy. Maybe their spouse just ignores them. They feel unwanted and unloved. Every day is depressing and they feel like they’re living life alone, essentially.

If they were dating someone who treated them like that, they’d break up with them in a heartbeat and move on. They wouldn’t feel guilty and no one would blame them. Does it really make sense to act as if they have to continue to endure that relationship just because they made the mistake of getting married? Does that force them to give up their right to happiness?

If you believe you are getting closer to a divorce for any reason, you need to know what steps to take and what options you have.

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